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Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)
in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated al qaeda, as some in the administration were talking about earlier? >> well, we have i think decimated a lot of al qaeda's top leadership particularly in the afghanistan-pakistan region. but i think wh
and claim vindication in the election. >> does a speechwriter write a draft and the president marks it up, sends it back? does the president write the first draft or sketch out an outline and speechwriter fills in the blanks? >> it's different for each president and circumstance. the worst speeches are always the state of the union addresses because everybody sees them coming a year in advance. by four years into the administration with a president who is a known accomplished writer and somebody who is proud and pride full of his literary accomplishments i'm sure he's had ideas for this. >> and close to his own speechwriter who has been with him a long time, they have a good relationship. there will be that give and take. >> at the end of the day when the speech is over, you will consider it a success if? >> if people feel better about america. i hope first it's short and second makes them feel better about the country and times they live in. >> i think if he calls attention to real problems in honest ways, but then asserts there's hope beyond the divisions of our current politics. >> tha
this election, gave him the confidence to say the election delivered a mandate for my vision of government, my vision of politics, one that involves gay rights, immigration, climate change, an issue that he hasn't really spoken of since his attempts to deal with it in 2009, fell short. so this was really a different president coming out, using the election as a turning point for his agenda and really making clear that that cautious pragmatist of the last four years, that often came out, is going to give way to someone who is unabashedly starting negotiations from a more progressive liberal standpoint than he was willing to do in the recent past. >> not surprisingly, there's been some push-back already. darrell issa said quote, i'm hoping the president will recognize that compromise should have been the words for today and they clearly weren't. john mccain said i would have liked to see a little more on outreach and working together. there was not, as i have seen in other inaugural speeches. i want to work with my colleagues. and i'm wondering what you think about this approach and i think that
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
. and the most elite of the elite are the group who have been re-elected. >> mm-hmm. >> and so i think that this is their chance, this is obama's chance to really say put it out there and say this is -- the first time is really -- this is what i want to do, and the second time is, like, this is what i want to be. and i think that in a case of a black president it's even more important because the first time around it was jubilant, it was the first black president, it was so exciting. the second time around is this wasn't a fluke. this guy really did it. he did a good job, and the american people reaffirmed that he did a good job and re-elected him. and so many-in some way because he's a black president i think that the second inaugural for him is more important than the first. >> well, that is the reason for the second inaugural. let's go to nbc's peter alexander because peter was there for that d -- the more intimate inaugural, if you will, having been sworn in some 35 minutes ago, give us some details. >> reporter: alex, this ceremony lasted barely a minute, the president surrounded
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. maybe roosevelt and hoover an example of that. franklin roosevelt had been elected by a landslide in 1932 over president hoover who was considered to be responsible for the great depression and roosevelt was a great schmoozer. finally, they reduced to looking at the super structure of thing it was the commerce department that was being built and roosevelt said, lovely steel. that was sort of the end of the conversation. the rest of the ride they went in silence. this happens much too often, but not on a second term. >> and david gregory, about a two-mile drive. >> and you remember in the modern era, george w. bush -- the language plate is -- >> yeah, the license plate just for a second here is a story. it's a -- kind of a protest legal local license plate here in washington, d.c. taxation without representation. the president has opted to use them on all the limousines. >> and that always comes up for presidents. >> d.c. has a delegate, a nonvoting member of congress. >> george w. bush met president clinton and they got along famously. they were swapping stories and how bush raise
elected by the people is being sworn in to office. just before noon at the capitol, barack obama will take the oath for his second term as president. this is a ceremonial swearing-in because the constitution requires the president to be sworn in on january 20th, and this year the 20th fell on sunday. so the president took the official oath in private yesterday in the blue room at the white house. the oath administered by the chief justice john roberts, jr. the public swearing-in and all the pomp and circumstance that go with it were put off until today and what a day it is. the temperature right now is in the high 30s. the sky is clear, a brilliant winter's day in the nation's capital. people are pouring into the national mall to witness a day of history. the first family began the day by attending services at st. john's church. that's right across the street from the white house. that's a long-standing tradition for presidents on inauguration day. joining me now in our cbs coverage is bob schieffer, our chief washington correspondent and anchor of ""face the nation."" bob, what
that will eventually go before the united states supreme court. that's why this election was so important. if there are any vacancy on the supreme court board it is important to appoint pro-choice justices, and we have to keep fighting. especially in these states that are dominated by these ultra conservative right wing legislatures and governors where they're passing these horrific laws in an tempt to close down access. right now in the state of mississippi there is one clinic in the entire state serving one is one of the poorest populations with the highest maternal mortality rates in this country. that governor and that legislature is determined to close that only clinic. we've got to be vigilant. we've got to fight. we have public opinion on our side by the way. even in a state like mississippi. we beat the person hood initiative 58-42. we beat the public. what we don't have are the governors and state legislatures and governors. we have to keep fighting. >> kathy spillar. thank you for coming on. i really appreciate it. coming up we have oprah winfrey interfere with lance armstrong.
the election against the incumbent, and at issue was the iran contra crisis, where americans were held for over 400 days after a group of islamic militants and students took over the embassy. as he was giving his inauguration address, the militants were being released. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> governor, are you prepared to take the constitutional oath? >> i am. >> raise your right hand and repeat after me. i, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. t
dynamics on the hill. a republican house that was elected within their districts by large margins and president who won an election. how do we bridge the gap? how do we actually get the deal done. >> we have a system that is incremental in nature. we're not a parliamentary system where, if you control the government, you can move very quickly and aggressively. i have always said that the american politics is played on the 40-yard line. and both sides feel very strongly about their philosophical position. but there is a deep identity of interest that i think needs -- leads to premature should lead to agreement. if you're the president of united states, there are two events that you know may occur in the next four years, which could totally derail your capacity to do the of the things you want to do about the nation, your positive agenda. the first is the terrorist and weapons of mass destruction. i think this president has been dedicated to intelligence gathering and his use of various capabilities to reduce that threat. and secondly, the issue of the financial crisis driven by the
of state is-- >> normally a republic -- formally a republic. >> five-year term elected. political parties many. i counted at least 15. gdp per capita, what do you think it is? >> probably a thousand dollars. >> $1,300. you're still with t. men and women dominantly female about four million. and airports with paved runways. how many? how many airports with paved runways in mali? >> three. >> eight. >> how many do we have with paved runways? do you know how many? >> hard to count them all. >> probably ten. >> the government has been overthrown by the military guy we trained. he grabbed power. >> secretary panetta said that the u.s. is not in a position to train the mali military because it's not a democracy. >> they defected to the al qaeda, all the guys we trained. >> are we doing this because of france or are we doing it because we know al qaeda is there? >> ultimately there's a threat to the u.s. down the road. but france is an ally and, yes, we're doing it because of france. >> primarily because of france? >> pry pearl-- >> -- pry pearl-- >> -- primarily-- >> what did lafayette do for t
goodwin. >> i think, i'll take all three of them. >> rose: i know you will. >> the re-election really sert fies the legacy. think if he wasn't elected. maybe obamacare would have been undone in congress. abortion rights might have gone backwards. now we are sure they will not under his administration. con tra ception will be out there. the sense that the country can move in the direction that he was trying to move it which goes back to what we've been saying all along that collective action can produce individual help. might have been shifted in the other direction had he not won. so everything he accomplished i think is multiplied by the fact that he won that reelection. it's human. bigger than it seemed at the time. >> rose: in fact, he has said, in the last several mths that this victory was as much, was as important not more important because in fact it was a referendum on what he had done before in the first four year. >> absolutely. >> rose: okay bob i leave it to you to sort of sum up the first term. >> first of all i think the real questions are what has he learned and how h
Search Results 0 to 25 of about 26 (some duplicates have been removed)